Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 5/8/2017

Do you dream about owning your own house? Has the idea of living in a property that adds to your personal equity started to appeal to you? If so, you're in good company. Each year, millions of Americans buy a house. Many of these homes are purchased with a home loan.

How you could get the right home loan

To protect themselves against loan defaults, lenders prefer to work with borrowers who have a history of being financially responsible. Doing so helps more than lenders.It can keep an entire economy from contracting, similar to the debacle that happened to cause the Great Recession.

Knowing what lenders look for in borrowers can help you to secure a home loan. To begin,your credit history is going to get reviewed while you're trying to secure a home loan. The amount of debt that you have and your history of making minimum or higher payments on these debts is going to be reviewed.

Your income, including income from second jobs that you work, and your spouse's income will also get looked into. Landing a higher paying job helps when it comes to securing a home loan. But, don't just increase your income.

Take advantage of military home loans if you served the country as a service member.If you work for a bank, you could get lower interest rates. Check with your employer to see how much you could save. If you don't work for a bank, consider securing a home loan through your current bank.

Opt for lower monthly mortgage payments

It could improve your chances of getting approved for a mortgage. It could also help you to save on interest payments. In addition to choosing a mortgage that has a lower interest rate, to secure a home loan:

Go after home loans that require lower monthly mortgage payments. Lower interest rates and military home loans are just two ways to achieve this. Applying for a home loan when the economy is recovering is another path to lower monthly mortgage payments. After feds start raising interest rates and the economy becomes stronger, mortgages generally rise.

Pay off as much debt as possible before you apply for a home loan. For example, you could pay off your auto loans and furniture. You can also pay off personal loans that you took out before you apply for a  mortgage.

Increase your liquidity. You can do this by investing more in stocks, cash savings and bonds. The value of your current home can also improve your liquidity. The value of a business that you own is another way to improve liquidity.

Get financial statements together to present to a lender. Items to get include income tax returns, pay stubs, investment account statements and business income, if you own a business. This includes an at home business. Also, get exiting loans and other debts together to present to lenders. The amount and type of debt may be sufficient, depending on the lender that you work with.




Tags: Real Estate   home loan  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 4/10/2017

Credit is tied to most big financial decisions you will make in your life. From things as little as opening up a store card at the mall to buying your first home, your credit score is going to play a factor. When it comes to mortgages, lenders take your credit score, particularly your FICO score, into consideration in determining the interest rate that you will likely be stuck with for years. How is your credit score determined and what can you do to use it to get a better rate on your mortgage? We'll cover all of that and more in this article.

Deciphering credit scores

Most major lenders assign your credit score based on the information provided by three national credit bureaus: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion. These companies report your credit history to FICO, who give you a score from 300 to 850 (850 being the best your score can get). When applying for a mortgage (or attempting to be pre-approved for a home loan), the lender you choose will weight several aspects to determine if they will lend money to you and under what terms they will lend you the money. Among these are your employment status, current salary, your savings and assets, and your credit score. Lenders use this data to attempt to determine how likely you are to pay off your debt. To be considered a "safe" person to lend money to it will require a combination of things, including good credit. What is good credit? Credit scores are based on five components:
  • 35%: your payment history
  • 30%: your debt amount
  • 15%: length of your credit history
  • 10%: types of credit you have used
  • 10%: recent credit inquiries (such as taking out new loans or opening new credit cards)
As you can see, paying your bills and loans on time each month is the key factor in determining your credit score. Also important, however, is keeping your total amount of debt low. Most aspects of your credit score are in your control. Only 10% of your score is determined by the length of your credit history (i.e., when you opened your first card or took out your first loan). To build your credit score, you'll need to focus on lowering your balances, making on-time payments, and giving yourself time to diversify your credit.

What does this mean for taking out mortgages?

A higher credit score will get you a lower interest rate. By the time you pay off your mortgage, just a hundred points on your credit score could save you thousands on your mortgage, and that's not including the money you might save by getting lower interest rates on other loans as well. If you would like to buy a home within the next few years, take this time to focus on building your credit score:
  • If you have high balances, do your best to lower them
  • If you have a tendency to miss payments, set recurring reminders in your phone to make sure you pay on time
  • If you don't have diverse credit, it could be a good time to take out a loan or open your first credit card
When it comes time to apply for a mortgage, you'll thank yourself for focusing more on your credit score.




Tags: Mortgage   credit score   loan   credit   home loan  
Categories: Uncategorized