Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 7/6/2020

Buying a home is one of those things in life that requires you to take a certain order of steps to complete the process. First, youíll need to save up some money for a down payment and all of the other costs that go along with buying a home. Next, youíll take a look at what you can afford and perhaps get pre-qualified. Then, youíll hire a realtor and begin searching for properties. Finally, youíll make an offer, sign for the mortgage and close on the home. After that, youíll probably buy some furniture and paint the walls to make yourself feel at home. 


Would you ever dream of making that big home purchase without actually seeing the property first? One of the most time-consuming parts of the home buying process is that of viewing homes and visiting property after property. 


There are actually many reasons that a buyer might buy a property without seeing it first. With the Internet, itís fairly easy to get an idea of what a house might be like. Too, if youíre an investor, itís sometimes worth the gamble to scoop up a property at the right price in order to score a great deal. 


Itís also usually not detrimental to buyers who are trying to get a home in a high competition market to go after places they really love immediately. The early bird does get the worm, right?


Foreclosed Properties 


Properties in distress may be in poor condition, but for the right buyer can be a great deal. Banks want to get rid of these places as soon as possible due to the expenses incurred by keeping them. 


Pre-Construction Properties


Not all properties that are bought sight unseen are fixer uppers. Some properties can be bought in the pre-construction phase. These homes havenít been built but are already on the market available for purchase. Many times, buying properties this way can be cheaper than buying the new construction home after itís built. 


The Risks


There are obviously many risks to buying a home sight unseen. First, pictures can be deceiving. You never really know what youíre walking into until you see it. Photographs can easily hide major damage. Until a home is physically inspected, you may not know what the costs will be to repair it. 


The same risks apply to new construction homes. The layout of the home may not be what youíre looking for, or the home may not include the features that you want.


When you do decide to buy a home sight unseen you need to weigh the risk versus the reward in the transaction. It can be a valuable decision, in the long run, to take a chance on buying a home that you havenít been able to physically inspect.       

 





Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 7/1/2020


10 Bonnievale Drive, Bedford, MA 01730

West Bedford

Rental

$3,200
Price

8
Rooms
3
Beds
1/1
Full/Half Baths
Beautifully maintained 8 room home is ready for occupancy. Enjoy a great floor plan in this 3/4 bedroom home with hardwood floors. Nicely sited on a knoll with an expansive level, private and sunny 30,000SqFt. lot providing space for family games and fun. Located in a peaceful neighborhood on a cul de sac with close proximity to Davis Elementary School and a path leading you to the abutting Minuteman Bikeway. Easy access into Concord and Bedford Center to enjoy strolling the shops and dining. You'll love not having to shovel off your car this winter with your 1 car garage. A huge added bonus is the owner will provide snow plowing and lawn maintenance free of charge. Care free living with time to enjoy your weekends.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses






Tags: Bedford   Real Estate   Rental   01730  
Categories: New Homes  


Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 6/29/2020

Selling a home may be difficult, especially for those who plan to list a residence for the first time. Fortunately, many real estate agents are available to guide you along the home selling journey.

Although there is no shortage of real estate agents at your disposal, it is important to note that not all real estate professionals are created equal. Therefore, it is essential to allocate the necessary time and resources to find a real estate agent who can help you achieve your home selling goals.

What does it take to find the right real estate agent to help you sell your residence? Here are three tips to ensure you can do just that.

1. Review the Current Housing Market

Take a look at homes that are currently available and the real estate agents who are associated with these properties. That way, you can find out which real estate agents are available in your area.

Also, don't forget to assess recently sold homes in your city or town. This will allow you to learn about the real estate agents who sold various houses and how long it took these housing market professionals to finalize the property sales.

You can always search the web for real estate agents in your area too. By doing so, you may be able to view client reviews that can help you determine whether a particular real estate professional is the right choice.

2. Consult with Friends and Family Members

Friends and family members sometimes can provide insights into their past home selling experiences. As a result, they may be able to connect you with a real estate professional who will go above and beyond the call of duty to assist you.

Furthermore, neighbors may prove to be great resources as you search for the perfect real estate agent. If a neighbor recently listed or sold his or her residence, you may be able to work with the same real estate agent.

3. Meet with Several Real Estate Agents

When it comes to finding a real estate agent, it never hurts to have a face-to-face conversation.

Set up meetings with several real estate professionals. This will allow you to learn about a real estate agent's background and expertise and decide whether you feel comfortable working with this individual.

In addition, try to get client references from real estate agents and reach out to past clients to find out what it was like to work with a particular real estate professional. As such, you'll be better equipped than ever before to make an informed decision.

The search for the right real estate agent often requires hard work and patience. With the right approach, you can hire a real estate agent who can help you accelerate the home selling journey and optimize the value of your residence.

Take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you should have no trouble employing a top-notch real estate agent.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 6/22/2020

Photo by Jeon Sang-O from Pixabay

Did you know that the terraced retaining walls that were built by the Incas at Machu Picchu date all the way back to the 15th century? There’s a reason that classic landscape design elements like the dry-stacked wall have endured for centuries. Not only do they look great, but they are designed to stand the test of time against harsh weather, earthquakes and centuries of use.  Dry-stacked walls are a good choice for any property and are versatile enough to perfectly fit in with any style. Keep reading to learn more about why we love dry-stacked walls and how you can utilize them in your landscape design.

How Do Dry-Stacked Walls Work?

Essentially, a dry-stacked wall is any outdoor stone wall that has been built without mortar to bind the stones together. This technique is ideal for retaining walls and freestanding accent walls. Not only are these walls incredibly strong thanks to interlocking construction, but they also can stretch and bend with the landscape because they are made without the use of mortar. This flexibility helps the walls to easily go along with the natural movement of the land during changes in temperature—particularly during the warmer months and times of continued frost. Because of this adaptability, dry-stacked walls don’t require a conventional foundation that must be set deep below the frost line.

Affordability

Additional benefits of investing in a dry-stacked stone wall include:

  • Natural Permeability — Water is able to freely pass through the mortar-less joints of a dry-stacked stone wall. This natural permeability helps to alleviate the need to invest in an additional drainage system, saving homeowners from having to divert water away from the wall to relieve pressure.
  • Longevity — Freely stacked stone walls are designed to allow for natural expansion and contraction. Therefore, this type of wall is much less susceptible to normal shifting and cracking that you might find with a traditional retaining wall. Ideally, your dry-stacked stone wall should look attractive and maintain its structural integrity for many years to come once construction is completed.
  • Variety — You can be creative as you’d like when building a dry-stacked wall. Whether you prefer round stones, river rocks or flat stones—there’s a stone material available to suit any design aesthetic. However, keep in mind that different stone materials are known for being easier to work with than others. For example, flat stone is typically the fastest and easiest option, while stones with rounded edges require more careful planning.

In addition to being attractive and versatile, dry-stacked walls can be created from a variety of materials. Typically, building a dry-stacked wall will cost homeowners anywhere from $65 to $100 per square foot, including all materials and labor. However, for those interested in an especially deep dry-stacked wall, the costs can climb. Working with an experienced landscape construction team can help to prevent costs from going outside your budget and allow you to enjoy peace of mind with a durable and long-lasting retaining wall.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Mary-Lou McDonough on 6/15/2020

Want to sell your residence? As a home seller, you'll want to take a cautious approach to the real estate market. That way, you can improve your chances of getting the best price for your residence, regardless of the current housing market's conditions.

Ultimately, there are many reasons why home sellers should err on the side of caution as they prepare to add their houses to the real estate market, including:

1. The housing market constantly fluctuates.

For home sellers, it is important to differentiate between a seller's market and a buyer's market. By doing so, a home seller can assess the current housing market and proceed accordingly.

In a seller's market, there is usually a shortage of high-end houses and an abundance of interested homebuyers. This means home sellers who operate in a seller's market may be more likely to stir up plenty of interest in their houses as soon as these properties become available.

Conversely, a buyer's market typically favors homebuyers, as it features a limited number of homebuyers and a wide range of home sellers. If you're selling your home in a seller's market, you'll likely need to price it competitively to help your residence stand out from the competition.

Allocating the necessary time and resources to analyze the housing market is key. With housing market data in hand, a home seller can determine whether he or she is getting ready to list a house in a buyer's or seller's market.

2. What your home was worth yesterday is unlikely to match what it is worth today.

The price that a home seller initially paid for a residence is unlikely to match what the house is worth today. Thus, a home seller should perform a home appraisal to learn about the present value of his or her residence.

During a home appraisal, a property inspector will assess a house both inside and out. Then, the property inspector will identify any problem areas with a house that could negatively affect the residence's value.

A home appraisal is exceedingly valuable to home sellers. It enables them to understand a house's strengths and weaknesses as well as uncover ways to transform a home's weaknesses into strengths. As a result, a home seller can use a home appraisal as a learning opportunity and find innovative ways to enhance a residence before adding it to the real estate market.

3. Homebuyers are always on the lookout for bargains.

Although a home seller will do everything possible to learn about the housing market, there is always the danger that a homebuyer will submit a "lowball" offer on a house. Conversely, a home seller who errs on the side of caution will be able to differentiate between a legitimate offer and a lowball one time and time again.

Lastly, if you need extra help as you get ready to sell your house, don't hesitate to work with a local real estate agent.

Real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide. They can help you get your house ready for the real estate market and ensure you can reap the benefits of a quick, seamless home selling experience.

Become a cautious home seller, and you can move one step closer to maximizing the value of your house.




Categories: Uncategorized